category : JavaScript

Don't Name Your Inputs 'Action' or 'Submit'!

Most browsers have a bug that isn’t really a bug. In fact it was purposely put there to make your simpler, but if you (or someone else writing the HTML code) do something in the right (read “WRONG!”) way, it could completely blow up. Specifically, if you assign your input tags a name or id attribute of “action” or “submit”, you can cause some very well hidden bugs.

Patterns for Asynchronous Programming With Promises

Promises are currently the best tool we have for asynchronous programming and they appear to be our best hope for the forseeable future, even if they’ll be hiding behind generators or async functions. For now, we’ll need to use promises directly, so we should learn some good techniques for using them right now, especially when dealing with asynchronous operations on collections, whether they happen in parallel or sequentially.

Synchronizing Asynchronous JavaScript With ES7

ECMAScript version 5 is the latest complete version of JavaScript available and is implemented in every major browser, but ES6 is in the works and promises a much better world for JavaScript developers with features such as a simple class syntax, arrow functions, built-in promises and the like. It doesn’t stop there, though; we’re already looking ahead to ES7 while ES6 is still cooking in the oven. In particular, I’m extremely excited about asynchronous functions.

Why Adapters and Facades Are Awesome

It’s been a long time since I’ve actually been on here teaching you something; 9 months since my last actual tutorial and really useful article. Sorry about that! I’m trying to get back on track now though. You should see much more frequent posting and hopefully some very useful posts. Anyway, this tutorial is about a great idea I implemented at work that involved the Adapter and Facade patterns. After using these patterns in this way, I have a much deeper respect for them and I want you to share that repect, so let’s take a look at some awesome ways/reasons to use them!

Rebranding for the Future

You all know that this site has been relatively inactive for quite a while. Well, I’m here to let you all know that big things are coming in the future. I wish I could say they will be coming soon, but until the book I’ve been writing it finished, I won’t be able to provide much, if any, content here for you all. Coming in early 2014, though, everyone should be happier. Here’s an update on the future of this blog.

I Have Some Announcements/Excuses to Make

Hi everyone! It’s been nearly two months since I’ve written my own post. This is pretty much unacceptable, but I do have some good excuses. Are you willing to listen to them? Or are you just gonna ignore this? Whatever, either way I don’t care too much. I just want to give an update on what is going on around here so you know what to expect and aren’t disappointed when you don’t see anything going on.

How DeskRoll Uses New Web Technologies

Today we will take a look at the inner workings of a remote desktop system. It is called DeskRoll, and it uses a lot of modern technologies such as HTML5 and WebRTC that bring the possibility of a remote desktop system to the browser. DeskRoll is primarily intended for individuals and small companies who need a simple remote access tool. We won’t be describing the system entirely. Instead we will concentrate on the new technologies which allow you to watch a remote desktop and control it. In addition, we will try to analyze some visible code of the system which is written in Javascript.

TodoMVC's New Version and New Home

TodoMVC is a place where a large number of people have turned in examples of building the exact same Todo web application while using different MV frameworks (and even some non-MV frameworks). Why? So that developers can come explore the code and decide for themselves which libraries and frameworks look best to them. For those wishing to explore the MV* landscape, this is can be a huge help for getting a quick look each framework.

The Huge Update to Twitter Bootstrap

It may not be ready for production, but the release candidate for version 3 of Twitter Bootstrap is a huge change from 2.3 and has me very excited about its future. Sadly, they have done very little related to JavaScript, but that doesn’t mean I can’t enjoy it. Let’s take a quick look at some of the major changes appearing in Twitter Bootstrap 3, CSS and JavaScript alike.

Using Marionette to Display Modal Views

For a while, I’ve been thinking about how best to handle showing modal dialog boxes for my applications while utilizing Backbone views. A lot of interesting ideas passed through my head, but none of them seemed exactly right. Then I saw a post by Derick Bailey where he described how he uses Marionette’s Regions to handle the work. His post is a bit on the old side and Regions have changed a bit since, so I decided to look into how to do it myself.